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June 5, 2011
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(Contains: nudity)
date with the wonderful Sassa in the colza field - romantic spring time
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:iconpinktinkcd:
PinkTinkCD Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2013
I like the idea of this picture, but I feel off-setting Sassa and showing more of the field and trees would enhance the shot so much.
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:iconjeremiahbg:
JeremiahBG Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
A beautiful image. Congratulations !!!
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:iconmivad:
mivad Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
I wanted to try something like this, in the Spring, here in Dresden... but hard to find model when I know nobody :(

wunderschön!
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:iconalexandrab24:
AlexandraB24 Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011  Professional General Artist
This beautiful work has been featured here [link]
Please visit and leave a comment
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:iconjb-fotodesign:
JB-Fotodesign Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2011
ja sassa ist einfach nur spitze
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:icondavidemartin:
DavidEMartin Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2011
A beautiful image. Great color and detail. She has an inviting look.
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:iconbound-eye:
bound-eye Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2011
It does make for a pretty field. I also like sunflowers and flax in bloom. Flax is tiny pale blue flowers.
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:iconwanderjaku:
wanderjaku Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2011
was there a history of two gay german?
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:iconepiphanist1248:
epiphanist1248 Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2011
Great image! but ... um ... why is it called "the rape field"??!!
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:iconbound-eye:
bound-eye Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2011
Wikipedia is full of interesting factoids:

"The word “rape” in rapeseed comes from the Latin word “rapum,” meaning turnip. Turnip, rutabaga, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, mustard and many other vegetables are related to the two canola varieties commonly grown, which are cultivars of Brassica napus and Brassica rapa. The negative associations due to the homonym “rape” resulted in creation of the more marketing-friendly name “canola.”[citation needed] The change in name also serves to distinguish it from regular rapeseed oil, which has much higher erucic acid content."
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